We have added x201 MQ screencaps of Jess from The Riot Club to the image gallery …

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Carnaby’s AFM slate includes new acquisitions Everything Carries Me To You, which has Jessica Brown Findlay (Downton Abbey), Matthew Rhys, Kate Walsh and Freddie Fox attached to star.

The romantic drama, currently in pre-production, follows an ambitious young dancer whose world is turned upside down when she discovers a note suggesting her lover may be cheating.

Emma Holly Jones (Dreams Play Apart) is attached to direct with Hilary Shor (The Paperboy) on board to produce.

Director Toby Tobias’ thriller Blood Orange, starring Ben Lamb and musician Iggy Pop and executive produced by former Miramax executive Colin Vaines (Gangs of New York), is currently shooting in Spain.

We have added x22 HQ photos from Jess’ Sunday Times Photoshoot from 2011 to the gallery …

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While Daniel Radcliffe continues to shed his Harry Potter stardom this month by starring in the grisly horror comedy Horns, the actor has already turned his attention to another upcoming project, in which he takes on one of his most against-type roles to date. In 20th Century Fox’s Victor Frankenstein, Radcliffe will put a new spin on the hunchbacked Igor, assistant and friend to the brilliant and destructive medical student Victor von Frankenstein (James McAvoy).

That a household name like Radcliffe is taking on the part of Igor, traditionally a supporting player in adaptations of Mary Shelley’s horror classic, marks one of many ways in which Victor Frankenstein will set itself apart from the crowd. When asked during an interview for Horns how his Frankenstein would sidestep comparisons to other works, Radcliffe explained that, in addition to there being “a lot of action:”
“I think our Frankenstein is a really kind of rip-roaring, fun adventure movie version of Frankenstein. I would really struggle to class it as horror. I think there are horror elements to it and nods to previous versions of Frankenstein, but it’s much more a film about – the thing that I hope will make it stand out is the relationship between James’ character and I. Victor and Igor are two people who come to need each other very much. The thing for me of the movie is actually about creation and, you know, Igor, my character, is taken out of this horrible abused life at the beginning of the movie and James sort of saves him and gives him this new life, sort of creating him in some sense, in creating this life that he has, and so because of that and because of the life he’s been saved from, Igor feels forever that he has this sort of debt of loyalty and the film then becomes about how much can that debt be pushed? How much can that loyalty be pushed before – at what point do you have to step out from the shadows of the person that created you and go, ‘I am my own person?’ Or, do you forever defer to the person that is responsible for your life? So it’s sort of, it’s a film about relationships set against the backdrop of creating monsters.”

That’s an intriguing thought, for sure. Most Frankenstein stories tend to focus on the monster more than the man who created him, so a tale entirely devoted to the ambitious doctor and Igor could turn out to be a terrific idea. Radcliffe went a step further during the interview to confirm that Frankenstein’s monster is not a central part of the story:

“One of the biggest differences between us and other Frankensteins will be that, generally speaking, the main relationship is between Frankenstein and the monster and the monster is created in the middle of the movie, and in our version it’s created right at the end and the journey up to that is really about how we come to that eventual idea. I’ve heard other people call it kind of an origin story for Frankenstein, but it’s an origin story for a Frankenstein you have never met before, if that helps. The quote that I got in trouble with with the producers was saying, ‘If you like the book, you’ll hate the movie.’ [Laughs]”

With two skilled actors like Radcliffe and McAvoy involved, Victor Frankenstein is certainly a project to watch. That Paul McGuigan (Push) is sitting behind the camera working from a script by Chronicle scribe Max Landis is also cause for excitement, as is the fact that the supporting cast includes Jessica Brown Findlay, Andrew Scott and Mark Gatiss.

Mark your calendars – Victor Frankenstein is alive on October 2nd, 2015.

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One of London’s oldest vintage clothing stores is threatened with closure after the landlord demanded nearly double the rent. The shop supplied dresses for last year’s Great Gatsby movie starring Carey Mulligan and Leonardo DiCaprio, which won an Oscar for its costumes, and the 1974 version with Mia Farrow and Robert Redford.

Annie’s in Islington has traded for 40 years. Customers include Kate Moss, Ralph Lauren and Downton Abbey actress Jessica Brown-Findlay. The shop’s owner, Annie Moss, received a letter from her landlord — Islington Benwell 3, run by Christopher Christou — saying her rent next year is likely to increase from £32,000 to £60,000. The firm also wants back-rent of £60,000, Ms Moss claimed.

She said: “The whole thing is a terrible shock. Business is not brilliant at the moment for most of us and the increase in rent is really over the top. You might expect a small increase but not this. I’m outraged and worried. I don’t want to leave Camden Passage and I appeal to them, please don’t kill off Annie’s.” Ms Moss opened the corner shop in 2001 but has traded in Camden Passage since 1974.

Some of the store’s most popular items are 1920s flapper dresses and lace wedding dresses. Local councillor Martin Klute said: “Doubling the rent is another example of the overheated property market. My fear is that … the landlords may really want Annie out so that they can sell the property.”

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With his quirky drama Horns just around the corner, Daniel Radcliffe stopped by to chat movie things with Empire. With his Seb Coe movie Gold currently in a holding pattern, the current Rad-slate is dominated by 20th Century Fox’s new take on Mary Shelley’s weird scientist, Victor Frankenstein. Radcliffe, who plays Igor (or Ygor), bills it as “a real adventure at its heart, a fun movie” while stressing that there’s brains to go with the brawn. “[It’s] very smart in terms of the ideas it’s discussing, [which is] a rare combination for a huge movie.”

Igor, of course, is Frankenstein’s (James McAvoy) factotum. The character maybe lost a little intellectual freight with Marty Feldman’s portrayal of him as a boggle-eyed lunatic in Mel Brooks’ hilarious Young Frankenstein (“It’s pronounced ‘I-gor’!”), so Radcliffe’s version will probably be a little closer to what Shelley intended.

“There is that physicality,” he stressed of Igor’s famous hunchback, “but the story this time around is told through his eyes. He’s granted more of a story than he has been before. It’s an equal partnership where one of them is trying to be dominant, [which is] what separates it from other Frankenstein movies.”

Unlike earlier movie adaptation – and more recently, Showtime’s Penny Dreadful – which dwelt on the relationship between Monster and his creator, here it’s between Victor and Igor. “It’s about the nature of creation, in many ways,” elaborates Radcliffe. “Victor gives Igor new life at the beginning of the movie, so he can be viewed as my creator, and at what point do you step out of that shadow or continually pay homage to the person who gave his life back.”

A Frankenstein origin story, then? “It sort of is,” agreed the actor. “The creation of the monster isn’t right until the end – you see their attempts at it. Although I’m not sure we’re teeing ourselves up for four more movies or anything.” Strangely, an early draft had a sequel-baiting ending. “James (McAvoy) and I looked at it and said, ‘Let’s make one good film first!”

Overseeing all this is Paul McGuigan, directing from a script by Chronicle‘s Max Landis. Alongside McAvoy and Radcliffe, Victor Frankenstein will boast the acting talents of Mark Gatiss, Jessica Brown Findlay and Andrew Scott when it hits our screens on October 2, 2015.

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Filming has been taking place in Hambleden for a BBC drama set in the Forties and Fifties. The two-part programme is an adaptation of the best-selling novel The Outcast by Sadie Jones, who has also written the script.

The show stars Jessica Brown-Findlay, who played Lady Sybil Crawley in Downton Abbey, George Mackay, who was in Pride and Sunshine on Leith, and Greg Wise, husband of Emma Thompson. It is produced by Blueprint Pictures, which has filmed in Hambleden twice in the last two years.

The coming-of-age story takes place between 1947 and 1957 in the fictional town of Waterford. Filming took place on three days last week in the village square and at St Mary’s Church and the sports and social club, which was transformed into a Forties-style police station. Other scenes were filmed in Fingest. Muffin Hurst, who lives in the village, said: “It’s always exciting when there’s some filming going on. It can become a bit tiresome with road closures but they are very good in Hambleden at notifying residents of what is going on and it’s a small price to pay for living somewhere so beautiful.” Ms Hurst, who runs the Henley Children’s Theatre Group, said her six-year-old son, Woody, had enjoyed watching all the action. “He sometimes finds it hard to separate TV and film from reality, so it’s quite good being able to show him how things get changed and then put on screen,” she said.

A year ago, Johnny Depp filmed musical fantasy film Into The Woods in Hambleden. His 1999 film Sleepy Hollow was also shot in the village. Other films and television series to have been filmed there include Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, 101 Dalmatians and Band of Brothers.

The Outcast is expected to be broadcast next year.

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This have started to quieten down now for Jess, after the release of The Riot Club and we have to wait almost a whole year for the promotional tours to start for Frankenstein with Daniel Radcliffe. Jess is currently filming Sadie Jones’ The Outcast if anyone has any set photos or further info, please send them in to us!

We have added some MQ outtakes of Jess’ photoshoot for NY Times Magazine earlier this year.

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Its about time we added x948 screencaps from Winter’s Tale

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Jessica Brown Findlay, Sam Claflin, Douglas Booth, Max Irons and Holliday Grainger all talk about making the controversial new British drama The Riot Club – Now In Cinemas!

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GQ UK Magazine features The Riot Club cast in its October issue in an Autumn Dress Code feature. Actors Sam Claflin, Max Irons, Douglas Booth, Jessica Brown Findlay, and Jack Farthing – reveal their fashion secrets.

Any fashion tips for us guys?
Men’s fashion is more interesting than women’s/ They get all the best shoes. I love a good brogue, anything like that. What do I like to see on a guy? Nothing too “Oh, bloody hell! That’s a jacket!” It should just be kind of there and not so intense that it’s the only thing you can see.”

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