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Jessica Brown Findlay Fan

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Jessica Brown Findlay has been interviewed by Metro.co.uk for a small snippet of Life After Life which was out last Friday. We will soon bring you HD screencaps to the gallery, so be sure to check later this week:

Jessica Brown Findlay talks about changing the past in BBC2’s Life After Life and coping with the anticipation of the novel’s fans.

Jessica has a habit of playing the most progressive character in a period drama. We know all about her turn as women’s rights campaigner Lady Sybil Crawley in Downton Abbey and now we have a new name to add to the list: Izzie Todd, a free-wheeling, high-living ‘modern spinster’ who has made post-World War I London her playground and damn what anyone else thinks. She also happens to be the aunt to Ursula Todd (Thomasin McKenzie), who has the strange habit of living her life all over again every time she dies.

Life After Life is high-concept sci-fi with a period drama twist – and a fascinating look at what it means to live your best life. But is Ursula’s life a gift or a curse?

‘If you were consciously repeating parts of your life, that would be torture,’ says Brown Findlay, charming company as she pauses to say please and thank you to those who greet her as she arrives on set for a different job. – ‘Part of the joy of it all – and it doesn’t always end happily – is the unknown. A lot of the reasons why we survive the things that come our way is that we’re not warned about it first, you just have to deal with it as you are living. A lot of the weight that Ursula carries is this feeling that she’s been here before.’

Would Brown Findlay change her past if she had the chance?

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After going through two days of voting (phase 1 and phase 2) we ended up updating the 2014 movie The Riot Club aka, first production name, Posh, into the gallery! Enjoy Blu-Ray quality screencaps as well as updated production stills from the movie, now available in the gallery:

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 Film Productions > 2014. The Riot Club

We also added some old interviews screencaps of Jessica while promoting the movie which also include two small scenes on set! Also, you may want to check one of my other fansites for co-star Holliday Grainger who also co-stared on The Riot Club. You can also see the interviews separated by interviewer: Film4, LondonLive 1, LondonLive 2, GlamourMagazine, OnDemandEntertainment, MSN, AP and The Fancarpet Extra.

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Interviews & Talkshows > Movies



A DREADED sunny day so I meet Jessica Brown Findlay in a hotel near the cemetery gates. This morning she’s in the Caledonian in Edinburgh, opposite St Cuthbert’s (where Thomas de Quincy is buried, if you’re interested). It’s the morning after the night of the world premiere of her new film England is Mine at the Edinburgh International Film Festival. That’s the new Morrissey film, if you didn’t know.

She does enjoy a good cemetery, does Brown Findlay. “I love cemeteries. I find them comforting. There are so many in London, really beautiful ones. There’s a great one in Stoke Newington. I go when I have a day. I like to go to the Good Egg in Stoke Newington for brunch and then walk through the cemetery with my partner.”
She doesn’t have a day just now, though. There is a film to promote. Jessica, let’s get down to it. Morrissey. Tortured genius or knob? “Oh God … Well, it’s the music that has always got me. Certain things can be said of the artist …”

Brown Findlay is a massive Smiths fan. All-the-albums-on-vinyl-sized. And maybe the fan in her hesitated before committing to England is Mine in case it all went Smiths up. “But the script was so beautiful,” she says.
Plus, it wasn’t about the flowers and the band and the theatrics. The film, she explains, is about “the world and soul and mind of someone before that”.
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Paul McGuigan has been dishing the details on upcoming film, Victor Frankensteinsaying it’s very different to Mary Shelley’s original novel and fans of the book might be in for a shock. Total Film sat down with the director to talk about why he wanted his adaptation to be different, and went behind-the-scenes to get some exclusive on-set pictures featuring Daniel Radcliffe and James McAvoy.

“[Frankenstein] has always been a mad scientist with funny hair – and that’s it,” shrugs director Paul McGuigan. “He’s not really had a backstory. So we give him one – a backstory that we’ve chosen to make up. So there’s not a reverence to the book. I think sometimes people are over- reverent about it. I don’t know if you’ve ever read it, but it’s as dull as dishwater, man. In a way, my catchphrase is always: ‘If you love the book, you’ll hate the movie.’ It’s that kind of twisting of it.”

Total film also caught up with stars James McAvoy and Daniel Radcliffe who were keen to support McGuigan’s more modern version of the tale. “There are things that you’d want to see out of the original,” admits McAvoy. “The archetypal mad doctor, mad scientist. And that’s perfectly there, in bucketloads.” But apparently, there will also be more comedy, action and… err, body fluids?

“One of the most stomach-turning scenes in the film will probably be the scene where I go from being a hunchback to not being a hunchback any more,” says Radcliffe. “It involves… I don’t want to say, because it’s so gross, I’ll ruin it.” We can’t wait!

Co-starring Jessica Brown Findlay and Andrew Scott, Victor Frankenstein will hit US cinemas November 25 2015 and UK cinemas December 4 2015. Read Total Film’s interview with Paul McGuigan, James McAvoy and Daniel Radcliffe in full in the new issue on sale October 23 2015.

Source: GamesRadar.Com




Downton Abbey star Jessica Brown Findlay talks about her starring role in BBC1’s emotional two-part post-World War Two drama, The Outcast. Jessica, 25, also reveals despite her success, she still has to audition for roles…

What can you tell us about BBC1’s new two-part drama, The Outcast?
“It’s not a particularly happy story! It is set in world were nobody is saying how they truly feel, and slowly those emotions start to come out. It’s very suppressed and filming was quite intense.”

What can you tell us about your character, Alice?
“She’s the second wife to Gilbert Aldridge, played by Greg Wise. His first wife Elizabeth drowned and Alice is far, far younger than any of the other wives in the village. Gilbert desperately thinks he’ll start again, almost from where Elizabeth was age-wise, but it results in Alice being very unprepared for a life in suburbia among mothers who’ve done it all and lived through World War Two with their children. Alice tries very hard to be a mother to Elizabeth’s son, Lewis, who witnessed his mother drown.”

Does traumatised Lewis warm to Alice?
“I think Alice just wants Lewis (George MacKay) to like her. But he’s so emotionally damaged from what he’s been through he isn’t able to talk about it, or get physical comfort from anyone, a hug or even someone just holding his hand. I think she takes the fact that he doesn’t immediately like her as a personal affront and it’s not. Alice finds it very difficult to communicate with Lewis and it only gets harder as he gets older.”

Does she plan to have children of her own?
“She desperately wants to be a mother and have her own child. She assumes if that becomes the case it will feel more like a family and that doesn’t necessarily work.”

Did you find it an emotionally draining role?
“It could be. I find it’s really important to shake it off. Sometimes after I’d finished a scene I wanted to go over to the other person and say ‘I didn’t mean it!’ I like to go home and cook something! “

Is Alice a lonely character?
“She is. She doesn’t really have any friends within the village. She’s lived in London and moved to this place where the other women don’t warm to her. Socially she feels she doesn’t know what to do or how to say things. She tends to put her foot in it a lot.”

How does she change as the story progresses?
“When we first see Alice she’s moving into Gilbert and Lewis’s house and is very excited. She wants to decorate it, get rid of the old things and put in the new. But slowly the house starts to feel like a prison. It’s her only place yet she’s not able to express or be herself there.”

It’s a village filled with secret troubles. What can you reveal?
“Everyone’s going through even darker things than Alice, Lewis and Gilbert, even though the Aldridges are made to feel as if they’re the only ones with problems! In the end Alice is able to accept the fact that she’s different and her family’s different, and that’s okay. It’s quiet change and self-acceptance.”

It’s another period drama for you. Did you enjoy the post-war costumes and sets?
“Interestingly, because Alice is quite different she doesn’t fit in when it comes to her physical appearance. She tries to be more glamorous than she really is, which riles a lot of the other mums! Later you see her desperately trying to conform and be like the others so she won’t be noticeable and her family will blend in. But it doesn’t work and as time goes on she lets herself go a bit!”

What would you like to do next?
“I’d love to do a comedy. That’s what I adore to watch. I think it’s the hardest thing to do but I’d love to go to work where if you trip up it can be included rather than cut. I can’t get enough of Modern Family. Ty Burrell is fantastic. But it’s a different pace so who knows?”

Given your success on Downton Abbey, Jamaica Inn and The Riot Club, do you find scripts come to you now?
“I audition for everything. But it’s changed from when I couldn’t get a job at all. It’s changed but there’s still that challenge where the bar is raised. You’re constantly a small fish in a bigger pond. But that’s where the challenge is. And as long as I learn and grow and am enjoying what I’m doing then that’s good.”

Based on Sadie Jones’s novel, The Outcast starts on Sunday July 12 at 9pm on BBC1.



Listen to Jess on BBC Radio 6 with Shaun here.

Shaun is after your Earworms before 8am, Matt Everitt has the Music News and actress Jessica Brown Findlay joins Shaun to chat about her new BBC drama – Jamaica Inn

Set in 1820 against the forbidding backdrop of windswept Cornish moors, the story follows the journey of young and spirited Mary (Brown Findlay) who is forced to live with her Aunt Patience after the death of her mother. Mary arrives at the isolated Jamaica Inn to discover her Aunt is a shell of the carefree woman she remembers from her childhood, and instead finds a drudge who is firmly under the spell of her domineering husband Joss.


Jess was on the cover of the Sunday Telegraph Magazine yesterday – we are hunting down a copy to scan for you! (New Layout too btw!) We hope you like it, its a little brighter and fresh – fit for summer – yay. We have also created a Facebook page for the fansite so you can keep up-to-date with all your Jess news, please like us!